14
Nov

jeshoots-com-219386Minimalism gets a bad rap. It’s viewed as a harsh aesthetic or strict way of life that denies its proponents of happiness. It’s seen as subtraction, a lot of saying no, and a sad absence of extra. Who doesn’t love extra?

But ask those who’ve embraced the lifestyle and they’ll explain that minimalism is not a lack of something; it’s simply the perfect amount of something.

Is it possible to embrace minimalism in a professional setting, and reap noticeable rewards? Yes. Let us at DLE Reporting give you some ideas:

  • Start with a minimalist schedule. Under-booking your day leaves it open to accommodate unexpected deadlines and challenging assignments. The built-in flexibility of a minimalist’s day leaves room for the creativity needed to achieve bigger goals, like speed increases or the mastery of steno briefs.
  • Keep a functional desk. As court reporters, our desks are moveable, for the most part, and accompany us from courtroom to deposition and back to our offices. Take stock of the items required to conduct everyday business, and make sure they’re within quick reach no matter where your desk is set-up. If you decide you’d like to also carry along visual inspiration, choose the items that inspire but don’t distract.
  • Put your to-do list on a diet. Start with an overall objective for the day, whether it’s related to productivity or the workload you must accomplish. From there, list your three most important tasks; each one should support the day’s goal. If it doesn’t, consider it excess.
  • Batch your tasks. Many of the tasks we perform daily are repetitive. Imagine how much time you could save if you set aside a specific time to combine similar tasks and accomplish them in one sitting. Take it from us: It’s noticeable.

Probably the greatest tip we can give you to achieve a minimalist work life and become more productive is to cut out distractions. We’re looking at you, Twitter and Facebook, and even the constant pinging of email alerts.

 

The odds are you’re wasting a lot of time on unnecessary productivity disturbers. If you can resist the allure of social media and anything else that doesn’t allow you to achieve your overall objective for the day, you’ll see improvements in your work output almost immediately.

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